Ohio boxer Osie Jones moves forward and wins a medal at the Tokyo Olympics

Ohio boxer O’Shea Jones made history and became the third American female boxer in history to win a medal in her sport. She is now in the semi-finals, where she meets the Chinese Guhon. Jones, the last female US boxer still fighting, is now guaranteed at least one bronze medal. She will be Claressa Shields (2012, 2016) and Marlen Espaza (2012) and the third American female boxer to win a medal. For them at a young age. “It was my first day but of course I hit her with one push, that was all I knew,” said Jones. “He taught me how to put them together. He taught me how to wrap my ankles. Then he made me save the girl! And she’s been there for about two years, ”said Jones. Five years later, her career got off to a good start and began climbing the organization. “My first year was 2016-17 and my first elite year was in the Nationals, so I’m told I can go to the Olympics about three more times. So I said, “Oh, I wonder why. “Jones said it wasn’t hard to avoid trouble while growing up, but he was always around. Her experience in the ring will enable her to change what is happening outside of the ring. It’s motivating because I see what’s going on around me, gangbang and drugs, and want a better life for myself and my family, ”said Jones. A year later than planned, I finally arrived in Tokyo. It’s an opportunity that she plans to make the most of it. “I think you’ve put your mind, your mind, your soul, your body – everything into what you have. You can do that. I don’t know what’s going to happen. So everyone, I just want to keep pushing. Jones qualified as the best American in the 69 kilogram weight class. She hopes to return the gold medal to Ohio. ..

Ohio boxer Osie Jones made history by becoming the third American female boxer in history to win a medal in her sport.

The welterweight Jones from Toledo unanimously defeated Maria Alta Gracia Moronta Hernandez from the Dominican Republic in the quarter-finals on Friday.

She is now in the semi-finals, where she meets the Chinese Guhon.

Jones, the last female US boxer still fighting, is now guaranteed at least one bronze medal.

She will be the third American female boxer to win medals alongside Claressa Shields (2012, 2016) and Marlen Espaza (2012).

Jones says it’s a journey that began for her when she was young and is now about to be on the podium.

“It was my first day, but of course I hit her in one fell swoop, just like everything I knew,” said Jones.

Jones didn’t know her call was in the ring until one day at the gym his father told her to “close”.

“He taught me how to put them together. He taught me how to wrap my ankles. Then he made me save the girl! And she’s been there for about two years, ”said Jones.

Jones was in front of the gate, of course. Five years later, her career began and rose through classes and organizations.

“My first year was 2016-17, the first elite year I was in the Nationals, so I was told I can go to the Olympics about three more times. So I said, “Oh, I wonder why. “I’m already winning, why really, do my best, you know,” said Jones.

Jones says it wasn’t hard for her to avoid trouble while growing up, but it was always around. Her experience in the ring will enable her to change what is happening outside of the ring.

“I am not satisfied with my current lifestyle. It’s my motivation because I see what’s going on around me, gangbang and drugs, and want a better life for myself and my family, ”said Jones. I did.

After a full day of weight training, conditioning and sparring during training camp, she finally arrived in Tokyo a year later than planned. It’s an opportunity that she plans to make the most of it.

“I think you put your mind, your mind, your soul, your body – everything in what you get. You can do that. I don’t know what’s going to happen. So everyone, I just want to keep pushing. Never give up and follow your dreams, ”said Jones.

Jones weighs 69 kilograms (152 lbs) and is qualified as the best American woman in her weight class. She looks forward to hopefully returning the gold medal to Ohio.

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